Texas Historic Landmarks Marker Information

Alexanders's Distillery

On this site in 1861 - 65 the William  R. Distillery met a wartime need in Texas. May 28, 1862, Governor Francis R. Lubbock closed all Texas distilleries, to save grain. Army calls for medicinal liquor (for opiate and stimulant purposes) soon caused him to order a few, including Alexander’s, re-opened. In drastic medical shortages, Texans throughout the Civil War gave such help as they could. Bandages, sewing silk, lint, polk weed, peach bark, barilla and other home medical aids went to various military units.  

Location: Center Circle on Salado Creek near Twelve Oaks,  Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Anderson Place

Built 1860 at edge of an old Indian campground, by James B. Anderson, one of town’s founders and a school trustee in Salado. Community leaders, lawyers and doctors have lived here. Boarding here in 1883 while a student at old Salado College was James E. Ferguson, 1915-1917 governor of Texas--and husband of the first women governor. Under paneling are cedar walls. Window glass is hand blown. 

Location: Main Street, Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Armstrong-Adams House

Dr. David H. Armstrong, who served as one of the trustees of the Salado Public Free Schools, and his wife Julia, built this home between 1869 and 1872. It later became the residence of a succession of Salado doctors, including Dr. D.G. Adams and Dr. J.E. Guthrie. The central cottage plan residence features elements of the Greek Revival style, such as the classical portico with Doric piers over the entryway. Location: Main and Thomas Arnold Rd., Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Barton House

Home of Wellborn Barton Pioneer physician of this region: for many years a trustee of Salado College. Built 1866 (John Hendrickson, contractor). Old military and Chisholm Trail passed here. 

Location: Main Street, Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Berry-Vickrey House

Medallion Only, No Inscription--The W.R. Berry home was built in 1870 by J.W. Vickrey out of slave-cut rock blocks, the walls being 20 inches thick. It was two stories high. At the turn of the century the rock on three quarters of the house, but not the foundation, was removed to be used on some of Mr. Berry’s buildings, the most notable being the Salado Bank, which was built exclusively with rock from the W.R. Berry residence. The remaining rock walls were extended to the one story cypress house now in use. 

Location: Main Street

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Mary E. Carpenter Birthplace

Great-granddaughter of builders. Daughter of Thomas S. and Mary Elizabeth (Robertson) Sutherland. First women vice president of student body, University of Texas. Married Leslie Carpenter: has two children. In 1954 was president Women’s National Press Club. First women ever to serve as executive assistant to the vice president of the United State, 1961. First newswoman to be staff director and press secretary to first lady, Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson. Location: 3/4 mi. SW of Salado Post Office, Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

William A. Davis Mill

The Davis Mill built in 1864 by William A. Davis. First stone mill with carding machine in this vicinity. A sawmill and gin were added in 1866. French burrs, leffel water wheel and silk bolt brought from Galveston by wagon in 1871. Made flour for central Texas homes. No widow paid toll at the Davis Mill. 

Location: Main Street, North Side of Salado Bridge, Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Moses H. Denman Cabin

Moses H. Denman built cabin 1867 (15 mi. NW), of hand-hewn, square cedar logs joined by wooden pegs; has fireplace of native stone; restored 1955. 

Location: Behind Salado Civic Center

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Norton-Orgain House

Built in 1872, by Edward R.A. Buckles, this I-plan vernacular house exhibits classical and Victorian detailing. Its two-story gallery features Doric columns on the ground level, which contrasts with the Victorian turned wood columns and balusters located above.

Location: Main Street at Thomas Arnold Road

Information from "History of Salado, Texas" compiled by MaryBelle Brown and Bill Kinnison

Robertson Plantation

Built by Col. E.S.C. Robertson and wife, Mary Elizabeth (Dickey). Rare ante-bellum plantation complex, comprising home, servants quarters, land, family cemetery, stables. Still a working ranch. The house, occupied by fifth generation of Robertsons, is an example of Classical Revival style. Shows Palladian influence in its recessed porches and gallery rooms forming terminal pavilions balancing a central gabled portico. 

Location: 3/4 miles SW of Salado Post Office, Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Rock Creek Baptist Church

Rose House

Built in 1870-72, this structure typifies the Greek Revival style with its symmetrical facade. The residence was constructed for former confederate officer Archibald Johnson Rose (1830-1903) and his large family. A prosperous farmer, Rose participated in state and community activities. He was a leader in the Grange movement and in efforts to improve the quality of education. Members of the Rose family owned this house for over 100 years. 

Location: Wm. Rose Way at Royal St., Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Salado Cemetery

Established 1856 on 2.5 acre site given by E.S.C. Robertson. Distinguished Texas interred here include the Rev. G.W. Baines, great-grandfather of President Lyndon B. Johnson; the Rev. and Mrs. J.E. Feruson, parents of Governor James E. Furguson: A.J. Rose Grand Master of A.F. & A.M. of Texas and trustee of Texas A&M College: J.J. Smith and S.J. Jones, both presidents of Salado College (1859-1885). Other graves here are for the veterans of U.S. - Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II and many past citizens of Salado. 

Location On Baines Street in Salado

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Salado Church of Christ

Founded in March 1859, this congregation first met in a brush arbor on the north bank of Salado Creek. The first two elders were James Anderson and J.W. Vickrey, both of whom were instrumental in the organization of Salado College. A frame sanctuary, erected on North Main Street in 1875 was destroyed by fire in 1908. A second frame structure served the congregation until 1961, when it was replaced by a brick sanctuary. A new building was erected in 1988. This church has served the people of Salado for over a century.

Salado Creek

Gushing limestone springs, abundant fish, flowers and trees have made the banks of Salado Creek a good home site.  Indians camped beside stream; Spanish explorers names it: the first Anglo-American settler was Archibald Willingham, 1851  College and town of Salado were built on creek, 1860. Stream once had 8 mills, thus was county industrial center. Chisholm Cattle Trail crossed it, as did Dallas--San Antonio stage line.  The 35 - mile creek is one of many which rise at the Balcones Fault - an outstanding North American region of springs. 

Information from "Texas Historical Markers of Bell County" compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Salado Methodist Church

Building erected in 1890 for a congregation organized 1854 at a site on Salado Creek. Circuit riders serving congregation included the Rev. J.E. Ferguson, father of a Texas Governor. Building committee for this church: J.L. Baily, W.H. Cawthon, J.M. Porter, Charlie Bailey, and Wallie Harkey drove wagon to haul the lumber from Austin about 50 miles to the south. Original members’ families still worship here. 

Located: Royal Street, Salado

Information from "Texas Historical Markers of Bell County" compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Stagecoach Inn

Constructed during the 1860s, the Stagecoach Inn was known as Salado Hotel and as Shady Villa before the current name was adopted in 1943. Military figures George Armstrong Custer and Robert E. Lee, and cattle baron Shanghai Pierce are among those thought to have stayed here. A good example of Frontier Vernacular architecture, the Stagecoach Inn features a two-story galleried porch with a second-story balustrade. 

Location: Main Street, Salado.

Information from “Texas Historical Markers of Bell County” compiled by Susan and Ray Lanford

Summers Mill

Built in 1866 on Salado Creek, parts for this mill came from Houston by ox-team. cornw as ground for meal. 

Location: from main street 4.5 mi. east on Royal St. , .5 mi. north on Armstrong Rd. 2 mi. east on barnes rd., 3 mi. north on FM1123 to just north of Salado Creek

Information from "History of Salado, Texas" compiled by MaryBelle Brown and Bill Kinnison

Site of Thomas Arnold High School

Possibly the most important non-residential structure in Salado was Salado College (archeological site #41BL241), which was built about 1861.  I t now exists only as ruins on a h i l l just south of the creek. The building originally stood two stories t a l l , with the main entrance facing south. The west wall and the northeast comer of the east wall are a l l that survive, and both are i n deteriorated condition amid piles of stone rubble. Examination of the remains, however, reveals a surprising sophistication in the construction of the stone walls, which were once plastered with a lime mortar and scored to emulate smooth, precise ashlar courses. Originally topping the two-story walls was a pronounced cornice with carved-stone molding just beneath the eaves of the roofline.

Location: South Main Street

Twelve Oaks

West Salado Cemetery

Located in ana rea populated by blacks following the Civil War, this cemetery dates to the 1870s. The earliest documented grave is that of Josie Fulbright, who died in 1877, althought according to local oral history there maybe earlier unmarked burials. E.S.C. Robertsons' widow deeded the land for  church, school, and graveyard purposes. While the community's school and two churches are no longer in existence, the cemetery remains an important link with the areas' early black history .

Location:

Information from "History of Salado, Texas" compiled by MaryBelle Brown and Bill Kinnison